Dubai DXB Entertainments posts losses in first half of 2019

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — DXB Entertainments, which runs Dubai Parks & Resorts, has announced revenue of $68.6 million for the first half of 2019, 13% down from the same period last year.Revenue was down mainly because of a drop in visitors from 1.46 million last year to 1.4 million for the first half of 2019. DXB Entertainments also said on Thursday COO Paul Parker would be relieved of his post. A replacement hasn’t been named.The company said last month it was paying $7.5 million to Six Flags after abandoning plans to build a $454 million version of the U.S. amusement park in the United Arab Emirates amid a slowdown in Dubai’s economy.DXB Entertainments is majority-owned by Meraas Holding, a development company owned by Dubai ruler Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum.The Associated Press read more

Mary Beard cut from US version of Civilisations fearing slightly creaky old

first_imgReally hope that friends in USA realise that my Civilisations episodes on PBS are very different from original BBC versions, have been drastically changed The originals were far from ‘anodyne’ I promise https://t.co/xnzAL710Yi BBC versions will be available on PBS digi channel.— mary beard (@wmarybeard) April 17, 2018 She added: “Can’t help think that there is something about a creaky 63 year old grey haired lady that doesn’t quite fit the bill. But I am probably smelling a rat where there isn’t one!” David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon SchamaCredit:BBC Responding to the review, Prof Beard said: “Really hope that friends in USA realise that my Civilisations episodes on PBS are very different from original BBC versions, have been drastically changed. “The originals were far from ‘anodyne’ I promise.”Saying the experience had left her grateful for the BBC’s treatment of Civilisations episodes, she told the Telegraph: “Whether people liked them or not, my BBC episodes were at least what I wanted to say!”The BBC and PBS versions were made by the same production company, but the two broadcasters were each responsible for their final chosen edits. A spokesman for PBS said: “From its initial stages, the PBS version of Civilizations was conceived to be distinct from the BBC version. aruments changed, talking heads added, my religion programme was made much more Christian focussed than it was originally— mary beard (@wmarybeard) April 17, 2018 Yes I noticed I hardly appear (not to mention, more important, the disappearance of most of my actual argument!).. cant help think that a slightly creaky old lady with long grey hair isnt ideal for US TV??— mary beard (@wmarybeard) April 17, 2018 Professor Mary Beard has accused a US broadcaster of editing her own episodes of Civilisations to make them more anodyne, saying her on-screen appearances as a “slightly creaky old lady with long grey hair” had been cut.Prof Beard, who hosts two episodes of Civilisations for the BBC in Britain, said the American edits of the show had seen her central arguments erased, her on-screen contributions reduced, and an episode on religion re-edited to focus more closely on Christianity.Suggesting she could not help thinking her appearance “isn’t ideal for US TV”, in a series of wry asides on Twitter, she admitted she felt “a bit shifty” reading criticism of a show she did not fully approve.Prof Beard, who has regularly spoken of the abuse she has received as an older woman on television, said she was “rather sad” about the changes, urging viewers to watch the full BBC version online.She aired her criticism on Twitter, after a Wall Street Journal’s review called the new series of Civilisations on American channel PBS as “anodyne”, with a viewer observing she “virtually disappears from the PBS version”. While the British version had three hosts, Prof Beard, David Olusoga and Simon Schama, lead their own programmes, the American edits see them join a number of “contributors” to each show including expert “talking heads” and narration from actor Liev Schreiber.Asked on Twitter why the changes were made, Prof Beard wrote: “I wish I knew .. to make it better for an American audience, people say…???? I am rather sad about it. Hope people will look at the originals when they are available.”Questioned on whether she had approved edits, she said: “Put it this way, if that’s how I had wanted to make the programme, I would have done it that way!” “The PBS series intentionally broadens the perspectives presented in each episode by including a wider range of interviews with international artists, art historians and subject experts who have a direct connection to their areas of expertise.“We value Ms. Beard’s contributions to the series, and regret to learn of her criticism, however the PBS version was always intended to be a different presentational style from the BBC version.” David Olusoga, Mary Beard and Simon Schama Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Former head of the Navy says decision to scrap she title for

“Political correctness is getting out of hand, the few are trying to bully the majority,” said Harry Silvers. “There is room in this world for everyone.”Lloyd’s List, a weekly shipping publication which ran in print for more than 250 years, has already abandoned centuries of seafaring tradition by calling all vessels “it”.Julian Bray, the former editor, wrote: “The shipping industry does need to move forward if it is not to risk becoming a backwater of international business.”They are maritime real estate. The world moves on. I can see why ‘she’ would suit a magnificent cruise liner but to a rusting old hulk it could be rather offensive.”However, I don’t think there is anything wrong with calling ships ‘she’ in conversation. It’s a respectable maritime tradition.”  A spokesperson for the Royal Navy agreed that the tradition should not be changed, and added: “The Royal Navy has a long tradition of referring to its ships as ‘she’ and will continue to do so.”The row began after the Scottish Maritime Museum near Troon changed its naming policy after vandals scratched out references to boats as “she” on information signs, forcing the charity’s director to scrap the gender-specific term altogether.A 19th century steam yacht called ‘Rifle’, which once carried Queen Victoria across Loch Arkaig while she was visiting Inverlochy castle in 1873, had its display signs defaced last week in the latest attack.Museum director David Mann has vowed to update all signage around the building with gender neutral terms.“We are moving in line with other maritime institutions,” said Mr Mann, who reported the incident to the police.“The debate around gender and ships is wide ranging, pitting tradition against the modern world. But I think that we have to move with the times and understand the way people look at things today.”On social media, supporters of the museum expressed their dismay. “This isn’t how it works. You don’t get to erase history, and like it or not ships have always been referred to as she,” said Jennifer Sorbara. A decision to scrap the “she” title for boats will “insult generations of sailors”, the former head of the Navy says.Admiral Lord Alan West, former First Sea Lord, has spoken out after a British maritime museum began referring to ships it exhibits as “it” in a bid to appear gender neutral.In a rare move, BBC Radio 4’s today programme took a call from a listener, Lord West, after he was so incensed by the news that he rang the show.He said that the move is “stark staring bonkers” and “political correctness gone mad”, adding: “It’s a sort of insult to generations of sailors, the ships are seen almost as a mother to preserve us from the dangers of the sea and also from the violence of the enemy. To change it in this trite fashion is just absolutely stupid.”We’ve done it for centuries as that’s how we refer to them, we have to be very careful with little tiny pressure groups that make people change things. It’s a very dangerous road we are going down.”I don’t think it’s dated at all…sometimes things that are dated are there for very good reasons and I am very proud of some of those facts.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more