Consumer Health Publisher Acquires University Health Publishing Group

first_imgMediZine, the New York-based publisher of consumer health education titles like Healthy Living, Remedy and Diabetes Focus, has acquired the University Health Publishing Group.Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.UHPG publishes products—including newsletters, reports and Web sites, in conjunction with Johns Hopkins University and the University of California, Berkeley.MediZine is a portfolio company of private equity firm Veronis Suhler and Stevenson. UHPG was represented in the deal by the Jordan, Edmiston Group.last_img read more

People on the Move 080609

first_imgFader Media has appointed Angela Williams to the newly-created position of advertising director. Previously, Williams served as an account manager at About.com and CondéNet, and most recently served at Stereogum/BuzzMedia.Deborah Needleman was named editor-in-chief of WSJ. magazine, replacing founding editor Tina Goudin, who recently signed on to write a monthly column for the magazine published by Wall Street Journal Europe. Formerly, Needleman served as founding editor of Condé Nast’s shuttered Domino magazine. New York magazine appointed Jennifer Miller as photography director. Miller most recently served as photography director at Cosmopolitan.Harper’s Magazine acting editor Ellen Rosenbush was officially named editor, replacing Roger Hodge. Before stepping up as acting editor earlier this year, Rosenbush served managing editor, a title she held since 1989. Consumer health and wellness publisher MediZine promoted Michael Cunnion CEO, succeeding co-founder Traver Hutchins, who is transitioning to chairman. Previously, Cunnion served as president.Jeff Ditmire was named director of strategic partnerships at M Magazine, which also promoted vice president of global partnerships Valarie Anderson to vice president and group publisher. Ex-Hollywood Reporter marketing director Vicki Robles was named West Coast executive director of the T.J. Martell Foundation, which funds innovative medical research to help find cures for leukemia, cancer and AIDS.Content management and advertising systems firm Atex promoted Alan Reardon to CEO. Previously, Reardon served as COO.last_img read more

Avengers Endgame 4K Bluray hits stores today for 30

first_img See the best Marvel Avengers cosplay from San Diego Comic-Con 2019 AVENGERS ASSEMBLE! Bring home Marvel Studios’ @Avengers: Endgame on Digital July 30 and Blu-ray August 13: https://t.co/6wVet96bw0 pic.twitter.com/luboLlLCvL— Marvel Studios (@MarvelStudios) June 26, 2019 Share your voice Comments Now playing: Watch this: 30 Photos TVs Blu-ray Players Media Streamers TV and Movies Avengers: Endgame could have been very different Amazon Fire TV Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of merchandise featured on this page.   Getting a disc or digital version with the directors’ commentary and deleted scenes will shed some new light on the movie, even for hardcore Marvel fans.  See Avengers: Endgame (plus bonus features) at AmazonAlso notable for the home release is that Endgame is one of the first movies to support Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos on the Movies Anywhere service — at least when viewed on 4K-capable Apple TV, Fire TV, Chromecast and Android TV hardware on compatible 4K TVs. Those premium HDR video and surround audio features will also be retroactively added to some previous 4K Movies Anywhere releases throughout the summer and fall. See Avengers: Endgame in 4K HDR at Movies AnywhereBefore you plunk down more cash to see it again, however, keep in mind it’s also slated to hit the Disney Plus streaming service on Dec. 11. That online channel arrives in November and will cost $7 per month. Avengers: Endgame takes disc form today. Marvel Studios The humble Blu-ray disc hasn’t been Thanos’d yet. Avengers: Endgame, the biggest movie in the world, hit stores today on Blu-ray, UHD 4K and DVD, joined by a handful of older Marvel films.Avengers: Endgame is now available at most outlets for $22.99 (1080p), $29.99 (UHD 4K Blu-ray). Best Buy has an exclusive SteelBook version for $34.99 — basically, a fancy case — while Target has a version with an exclusive book — Avengers Initiative: The First 10 Years — for the same price.The release of Endgame is accompanied by five other remastered Marvel titles on UHD 4K Blu-ray — Iron Man, Iron Man 2, Iron Man 3, Thor, and Thor: The Dark World — with more expected soon.See Avengers: Endgame SteelBook Edition at Best BuyThe $20 digital version of Endgame was released earlier this month on sites such as Amazon, iTunes and Vudu. In July, Endgame surpassed Avatar as the highest-grossing movie of all time, thanks in part to a theatrical re-release in recent weeks that included a post-credits scene and Stan Lee tribute. Marvel Thor Amazon Iron Man 3 News • Apple Music is now available on Amazon Fire TV Review • Amazon Fire TV: Affordable Alexa-infused 4K streaming Tags 2:00last_img read more

Bengaluru all set to host Asianlevel Olympic qualifier swimming competition

first_imgYoung Indian swimmers that will be featuring in this eventAmong the other sporting distinctions that Bengaluru has, being the nerve centre of Indian swimming is also one. The city possesses by far the best infrastructure for swimming events and training. It is as a result of this that the 10th Asian Age Group Championships – an event organised under the auspices of Asia Swimming Federation – will take place in the city from September 24 – October 2, 2019.What makes this tournament more special is the fact that it has been designated by FINA as an Olympic qualifying event. This means that the Indian swimmers will have a great opportunity on their home turf, or more aptly in their home pools, to enter the big league of world swimming.It will also be an event that will see participation on a much bigger scale than some of the previous editions. Representatives of 40 countries would be taking part, amounting to more than 1200 participants. All the major aquatic disciplines would be held – swimming, diving, artistic swimming and water polo. Organising Committee of 10th Asian Age Group ChampionshipThree venues have been chosen for these events. The Padukone-Dravid Centre for Sports Excellence will host swimming events while water polo will be held at Sports Authority of India centre. The latter venue will also host diving. The third venue for this sporting bonanza would be Kensington Swimming Pool in Ulsoor.Virendra Nanavati, Vice President of Indian Olympic Association (IOA), expressed his happiness at India getting the chance to host this event. “This is a very crucial period for the Indian swimmers as some of them are vying for the ‘A’ Qualification mark for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.”At the recent FINA World Championships we had a good participation with six swimmers, four Open Water swimmers and one diver qualifying to take part and some of them even improved the best Indian Performance record. Good show here at the 10th AASF Asian Age Group Championships Bengaluru 2019 will put them in good stead to make the qualification mark for the forthcoming Olympics,” he concluded by saying.Indeed, it would be a great opportunity for people of Bengaluru to enjoy top-level aquatic contests and for the local players to make a mark.last_img read more

Nanoscopic protein motion on a live cell membrane

first_img LEFT: (a) A TEM (transmission electron microscope) image of a filopodium including an EGFR–GNP. (b), A filopodium surface reconstructed from 780,000 trajectory points with a localization error of σx,y = 2 nm recorded at 1,000 fps. Inset, cross-sectional slice that depicts a cylindrical surface of diameter 150 nm after accounting for the size of the GNP. (c), A raw 13 min trajectory (left) broken into four subsequent pieces that reveal the journey to and from the tip, with arrows marking direction of net motion. (d), An ATOM plot of c, corrected for filopodium drift. (e), A surface interpolation from the final 80 s. The ring-like confinement in the final phase (marked with a triangle) is a 3D pit. The scale bars are 200 nm (a), 1 μm (x, y) and 200 nm (z) (b), 1,000 nm (c) and 100 nm (x, y) and 50 nm (z) (e). RIGHT: (a), A lateral trajectory of a 48 nm GNP probe. Scale bar, 100 nm. A lower temporal sampling of this confinement would have underestimated the extent of bounding. (b), Ci of the trajectory (using a time lag of five frames), which shows partially hindered diffusion with a propensity for freer diffusion in the centre. (c), An ATOM plot of a. (d), A cut through the 3D-ATOM plot along the line of the black triangle in c shows that occupancy favours an innermost disk-like region. The axes denote 100 nm in both c and d. (e), Conversion of the temporal 2D occupation from c into an effective potential energy distribution. (f–j), Equivalent to a–e, but for a 20 nm GNP probe. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 More information: Richard W. Taylor et al. Interferometric scattering microscopy reveals microsecond nanoscopic protein motion on a live cell membrane, Nature Photonics (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 Philipp Kukura et al. High-speed nanoscopic tracking of the position and orientation of a single virus, Nature Methods (2009). DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1395 Jordan A. Krall et al. High- and Low-Affinity Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Ligand Interactions Activate Distinct Signaling Pathways, PLoS ONE (2011). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015945 In a recent study, Richard W. Taylor and colleagues at the interdisciplinary departments of Physics and Biology in Germany developed a new image processing approach to overcome this difficulty. They used the method to track the transmembrane epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with nanometer scale precision in three dimensions (3-D). The technique allowed imaging across microseconds to minutes. The scientists provided examples of nanoscale motion and confinement using the method to image ubiquitous processes such as diffusion in plasma membranes, transport in filopodia and rotational motion during endocytosis. The results are now published in Nature Photonics. While steady progress in fluorescence microscopy has allowed scientists to monitor cellular events at the nanometer scale, a great deal still remains to be accomplished with advanced imaging systems. The challenges of fluorescence microscopy occurred due to the finite emission rate of a fluorescent source (dye molecule or semiconductor quantum dot), where too few photon emissions during a very small time-frame prevented effective or prolonged imaging. The central difficulty of scattering-based microscopy is relative to the nanoscopic probe, which competes against the background noise and a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR); limiting the potential of imaging to only a few nanometers in high speed tracking experiments. iSCAT microscopy on live cells. a, Experimental arrangement of the iSCAT microscope for live-cell imaging. Cells are plated in a glass-bottomed dish under Leibowitz medium. (a) micropipette delivers the EGF–GNP probes directly onto the cell culture, where they specifically target the EGFR protein in the cell membrane. The bright-field illumination channel from above assists in inspecting the culture but is not required for iSCAT imaging. L1–L3, lenses; O1, ×100 objective; BS, 90:10 beam splitter; DM, 590 nm short-pass dichroic mirror. iSCAT imaging was performed with illumination intensities of 1–8 kW cm−2, which are known to be viable for HeLa at the wavelength of interest. Inset, wavefronts of the fields contributing to the iSCAT signal. (b), A section of the membrane of the HeLa cell before labelling, viewed via reflection iSCAT. (c), iSCAT image of the cell membrane including a bound EGF–GNP probe. (d), The PSF extracted from c. Scale bars in b–d are 1 μm. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 In the experiments, Taylor et al. introduced the epidermal growth factor-gold nanoparticle (EGF-GNP) probes to the sample chamber of the microscope using a micropipette to label the EGFRs (epidermal growth factor receptors) on HeLa cells and verified that the probes stimulated the EGFRs. Previous studies had already indicated that the probe size could influence rates of lipid diffusion in synthetic membranes, although they did not affect the mode of diffusion. Additionally, in live cells, molecular crowding was negligible for particles equal to or smaller than 50 nm. Diffusion on a filopodium. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 Journal information: Nature Photonics Taylor et al. verified these two concrete cases in the present work by comparing GNPs of varying diameters at 48 nm and 20 nm. The scientists then conducted fluorescent and biochemical studies to suggest that the EGF-coated GNPs activated EGFR signaling, much like the freely available EGFs, indicating that the label did not hinder biological functions. To overcome background noise related to molecular imaging the scientists implemented a new algorithm, which extracted the full iSCAT-point spread function (iSCAT-PSF) directly from each frame for clarity. Since existing techniques are unable to visualize features at high spatial and temporal resolution, many details on intracellular activity remain a matter of debate. In response, the new method by Taylor et al. offered a wealth of dynamic heterogeneities in 3-D to shed light on intracellular protein motion.The scientists first quantitatively studied subdiffusion in the plasma membrane by considering a 2-D example of the EGFR journey on the membrane of a living HeLa cell. For this, they computed the mean square displacement (MSD) for the whole trajectory of motion. Taylor et al. did not need to make assumptions on the nature of diffusion or its geographic landscape during the computation. They gauged the occurrence of biological diffractive barriers and confinements by observing the degree of directional correlation between two vectorial steps across a time span. Explore further Raw video of an epidermal growth factor-gold nanoparticle (EGFR–GNP) diffusing on a HeLa cell membrane. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 © 2019 Science X Network , Nature Methods The scientists thus gained insight on the nanoscopic details of diffusion along the filopodium and recorded the data across 13 minutes. They analyzed the 3-D trajectory to create the filopodium topography using gold nanoparticles as a ‘nano rover’ and mapped the surface topology of cellular structures for deeper examination. They plotted the trajectory ATOM (accumulated temporal occupancy map) and found that the 3-D representation was consistent with the biological step of pre-endocytic membrane invagination. High-speed microscopy techniques such as iSCAT are necessary to obtain high-resolution temporal information and prevent blurring effects during nanoparticle localization-based imaging. The scientists demonstrated this feature by recording confined diffusion at 30,000 fps (frames per second) with 48 nm and 20 nm GNPs. They followed the experiments with ultra-high-speed 3-D tracking of proteins at 66,000 fps using a short exposure time of 10 µs within a time duration of 3.5 seconds. Fast iSCAT microscopy imaging provided further evidence to reveal the intricate features of endocytic events relative to clathrin-mediated endocytosis in HeLa cells when simulated by low concentrations of EGF. In this way, Taylor et al. noted that the new technique could faithfully record nano-topographical information. The results matched the observations recorded with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) without significant differences on probe size reduction from 48 nm to 20 nm, while providing new insights. The new insights included details of subdiffusion, nanoscopic confinement, 3-D contours of filopodia and clathrin structures at the nanoscale. The scientists intend to combine iSCAT with in situ super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to understand the trajectories of proteins, viruses and other nanoscopic biological entities. Taylor et al. aim to advance the methods of image analysis to track GNPs smaller than 20 nm in the future and believe the new technology and additional optimization will allow them to specifically understand the life cycle of viruses without using an external label for tracking. In the present work, Taylor et al. used interferometric scattering (iSCAT) microscopy to track protein in live cell membranes. The method could visualize probe-cell interactions to understand the dynamics between diffusion and local topology. During the experiments, the scientists used gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to label epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) in HeLa cells. The EGFRs are type I transmembrane proteins that can sense and respond to extracellular signals, whose aberrant signaling is linked to a variety of disease. Taylor et al. showed the GNP-labelled protein as a ‘nano-rover’ that mapped the nano-topology of cellular features such as membrane terrains, filopodia and clathrin structures. They provided examples of subdiffusion and nanoscopic confinement motion of a protein in 3-D at high temporal resolution and long time-points. Cellular functions are dictated by the intricate motion of proteins in membranes that span across a scale of nanometers to micrometers, within a time-frame of microseconds to minutes. However, this rich parameter of space is inaccessible using fluorescence microscopy, although it is within reach of interferometric scattering (iSCAT) particle tracking. The new iSCAT technique is, however, highly sensitive to single and unlabelled proteins, thereby causing non-specific background staining as a substantial challenge during cellular imaging. , PLoS ONE Citation: Nanoscopic protein motion on a live cell membrane (2019, May 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-nanoscopic-protein-motion-cell-membrane.html Diffusion on the plasma membrane. (a), A lateral diffusional trajectory (17.5 μs exposure time, see color scale for chronology). (b), MSD (mean square displacement) versus τ. The blue curve shows the MSD of a. The black curve is simulated normal diffusion (α= 1), with the grey envelope indicating the uncertainty. (c), The diffusional exponent of rolling windows (color scale) over the trajectory. Regions of subdiffusion (α<1) are indicated by darker shades. (d), αi through time. The grey shading represents a mean uncertainty of 7 ± 4%, corresponding to a 95% confidence interval for a window of 100 ms (1,000 frames) and τ= 250 μs. The points marked with the asterisk correspond to the circle in c. (e), The step-direction Ci for rolling windows along the trajectory. (f), The step-direction Ci plotted through time, with the shading denoting uncertainty. (g), ATOM occupation plot with residency time (colour scale). The bin size corresponds to the localization error. Noteworthy regions of extended occupation, marked as loops and whirls (i)–(iii), are indicative of persistent nanoscopic structures. The enclosed region represents a dense patch of notable subdiffusion. Scale bars, 100 nm. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: 10.1038/s41566-019-0414-6 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Nanoscale magnetic imaging of ferritin in a single cell The scientists then assessed the popularity of each trajectory pixel in space by introducing an accumulated temporal occupancy map (ATOM). In this technique, they divided the lateral plane of the trajectory into nanometer-sized bins and counted the occurrence of the particle in each bin. The results indicated the arrangement of nanostructures in loops and whirls within a minimal lifetime of 250 nanoseconds (5000 frames) to potentially portray a pre-endocytic step. In total, the simulated observations showed how protein diffusion was affected by the substructure of the cell.The iSCAT microscopy technique allowed scientists to record effects for a very long period of time, which they used together with 3-D imaging capabilities to follow EGFRs on a filopodium. The filopodia are biologically rod-like cellular protrusions containing bundles of actin filaments of up to 100 to 300 nm in diameter and 100 µm in length. The nanostructures can sense mechanical stimuli for chemoattraction or repulsion in the cellular microenvironment while providing sites for cell attachment. Ligand binding and EFGR activation on filopodia occurred at low concentrations of EGF, followed by its association with actin filaments and retrograde transport of EFGR to the cell body. last_img read more