Heres the magnificent last view NASAs Kepler Space Telescope ever saw

first_img2:57 End of an era for space exploration Share your voice Now playing: Watch this: A composite image of Kepler’s final view. The missing tiles are due to parts of the camera that failed. NASA The final thing NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope captured was everything, or at least it looks that way.NASA ran out of fuel last year and was put into a permanent sleep mode on Oct. 30. The final full-field image it took can be seen in the above mosaic captured Sept. 25. You can see the telescope’s full view of the sky and an abundance of stars within. Some blocks of the composite image are blacked out due to failures by parts of the camera. Fortunately, the device had a modular design that allowed for other parts of the image to be retained.  Kepler helped revolutionize how we think about the universe by enabling the discovery of thousands of exoplanets beyond our solar system, making it clear our galaxy and others are packed with other worlds. Enlarge ImageKepler’s view of K2-138 with its six planets sized between Earth and Neptune. It was the first multi-planet system entirely discovered by citizen scientists. NASA/Ames Research Center But it struggled to make some of those discoveries. A few years into its mission, the parts that help it stay pointed at a target began to fail. Engineers had to come up with a work-around that basically used the subtle pressure coming off the sun itself to keep the telescope steady. Kepler went on making more finds for half a decade before finally running out of gas. To the right is one of the later star systems Kepler helped discover called K2-138. It is believed to host six planets roughly between the sizes of Earth and Neptune. The GIF shows images collected of the system during Kepler’s last day of photography.The pixelated view might not be much to look at, but Kepler played a pivotal role in pointing the way towards promising systems like this so that future telescopes might provide a clearer view one day, and perhaps even find evidence of alien life. NASA turns 60: The space agency has taken humanity farther than anyone else, and it has plans to go further.Crowd Control: A crowdsourced science fiction novel written by CNET readers. 1 Comment Sci-Tech Tags NASA Spacelast_img read more

4 sentenced to death for Rupa rape and murder

first_imgThe accused being taken to Tangail court. Photo: Tangail A Tangail court on Monday sentenced four persons to death in a case filed over the murder of Zakia Sultana Rupa after gang rape in a running bus on 25 August last year, reports UNB.Women and Children Repression Prevention Tribunal judge Abul Hossain Miah announced the verdict in a crowded courtroom.The condemned convicted are – bus driver Habibur and helpers Shamim, Akram and Jahangir.Besides, bus supervisor Safar Ali was sentenced to seven years imprisonment and fined Tk 100,000.According to prosecution, Rupa, 27, was murdered after gang rape in the running bus while returning to Mymensingh from Bogra.Police recovered her blood-stained body from Panchmail area of Madhupur upazila on that night.Following a post-mortem, she was buried at the town central graveyard as unclaimed body. Later, victim’s relatives identified her.On 28 August, police arrested the five accused from Mymensingh in this connection.On 31 August, police exhumed the body of Rupa and handed it over to her family for burial in a proper manner.On 25 October last, the court accepted the charge sheet against the accused — bus driver Habibur, its supervisor Safar Ali, and helpers Shamim, Akram and Jahangir — in the case.On 23 January, the court concluded the recording of depositions of witnesses in the case when 27 witnesses out of total 32 testified before the court.last_img read more

Tehran says Trumps genocidal taunts wont end Iran

first_imgIran`s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. Photo: AFPIranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Monday the “genocidal taunts” of US president Donald Trump will not “end Iran”, as tensions spike between the two countries.”Iranians have stood tall for millennia while aggressors all gone. Economic terrorism and genocidal taunts won’t ‘end Iran’,” Zarif wrote on Twitter.”Never threaten an Iranian. Try respect — it works!” he added.In another tweet, Zarif accused Trump of allowing his team to “trash diplomacy” and “abet war crimes — by milking despotic butchers via massive arms sales”.The riposte by Iran’s top diplomat follows an ominous warning by Trump, who on Sunday suggested the Islamic republic would be destroyed if it attacked US interests.”If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again,” Trump tweeted.Relations between Washington and Tehran plummeted a year ago when Trump pulled out of a landmark 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and imposed tough sanctions.Iranian officials have repeatedly slammed the unilateral US sanctions as “economic terrorism,” saying that they have impeded the flow of essential goods.Tensions have risen further this month with Washington announcing more economic measures against Tehran, before deploying a carrier group and B-52 bombers to the Gulf over unspecified alleged Iranian “threats”.The Trump administration last week ordered non-essential diplomatic staff out of Iraq, citing the danger posed by Iranian-backed Iraqi armed groups.On Sunday a rocket was fired into the Green Zone of the Iraqi capital Baghdad, which houses government offices and embassies including the US mission. It was not immediately clear who was behind the attack.While the US claim of Iranian “threats” has been met with widespread scepticism outside the United States, the mounting tensions have sparked growing international concern.”I would say to the Iranians, do not underestimate the resolve on the US side in the situation,” British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt told reporters on Monday in Geneva.”They don’t want a war with Iran, but if American interests are attacked they will retaliate,” he added.Hunt said that Britain wanted “the situation to de-escalate” and urged Iran “to pull back from the destabilising activities it does throughout the region.”- ‘Goaded’ into war -US media reports say Trump’s hawkish national security adviser John Bolton is pushing for war with Iran, but others in the administration are resisting.Zarif’s tweet said Trump is being “goaded by B Team,” a term he coined to refer to Bolton as well as Israel’s prime minister and the crown princes of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates who are all pushing a hard line on Tehran.Before Trump’s Twitter threat, Zarif had downplayed the prospect of a new war in the region, saying Tehran opposed it and nobody was under the “illusion” the Islamic republic could be confronted.Iran is exercising “maximum restraint” in the face of an “unacceptable” escalation by the United States, Zarif said on Thursday.Tehran has threatened to gradually withdraw from the 2015 nuclear deal if partners still in the agreement — Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia — do not help it to circumvent US sanctions.Saudi Arabia on Saturday called for emergency regional talks to discuss the mounting Gulf tensions.It came days after mysterious sabotage attacks on several tankers in highly sensitive Gulf waters and drone strikes on a Saudi crude pipeline by Yemen rebels who Riyadh claimed were acting on Iranian orders.Saudi Arabia’s minister of state for foreign affairs, Adel al-Jubeir, said Sunday his country does not want to go to war with Iran but would defend itself.Saudi Arabia “does not want a war, is not looking for it and will do everything to prevent it,” he said.”But at the same time, if the other side chooses war, the kingdom will respond with strength and determination to defend itself and its interests.”last_img

Researchers find new source for cold ocean water abyssal layer

first_img Journal information: Nature Geoscience Scientists test powerful ocean current off Antarctica Citation: Researchers find new source for cold ocean water abyssal layer (2013, February 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-source-cold-ocean-abyssal-layer.html Explore further Intense sea-ice production in the CDP, revealed from satellite data. Credit: Nature Geoscience (2013) doi:10.1038/ngeo1738 AABW is important because as it moves north from its source, it creates ocean currents that have a major impact on global climate. Until now however, scientists have only been able to identify three major sources—not nearly enough to explain the amount of AABW seen in the ocean. In this new research, the team suspected that a different type of source might be at play—one that came about in a polynya (area of open water that can’t freeze over due to rapid wind and water movement), rather than directly offshore of shelf ice. To find out they employed the use of traditional undersea sensors, and less traditionally, sensors attached to the heads of elephant seals.Ocean currents result from AABW due to the way it’s formed. When seawater freezes, much of the salt in the ice is pushed back into the water giving it a very high salinity—and because it’s also very cold, it tends to sink. As it hits the bottom it joins other cold water that slowly seeps toward the edge of the continental shelf, where if falls over into the abyss, rather like an under-the-ocean waterfall. That water falling is what generates the currents that flow north.Researchers had suspected for years that a source for AABW existed somewhere near what they call the Weddell Gyre, but had not been able to find it. In this new research, the team used satellite data to pick a likely polynya, and settled on Cape Darnley. There they sank sensors and studied data supplied by the elephant seal sensors. It was the data from the seals, the researchers report, that showed that areas in which they swam—at times as deep as 1,800 meters—revealed the layer of cold dense water the researchers were looking for—the fourth AABW source.After analyzing the Cape Darnley polynya source, the researchers have concluded that it is likely responsible for 6 to 13 percent of circumpolar AABW totals, which suggests they say, that other similar sources are out there still waiting to be found.center_img (Phys.org)—An international team of ocean researchers has found a fourth source of Antarctic bottom water (AABW)—the very cold, highly saline layer of water that lies at the bottom of the ocean. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the team describes how they discovered the site in the Cape Darnley polynya. More information: Antarctic Bottom Water production by intense sea-ice formation in the Cape Darnley polynya, Nature Geoscience (2013) doi:10.1038/ngeo1738AbstractThe formation of Antarctic Bottom Water—the cold, dense water that occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean—is a key process in global ocean circulation. This water mass is formed as dense shelf water sinks to depth. Three regions around Antarctica where this process takes place have been previously documented. The presence of another source has been identified in hydrographic and tracer data, although the site of formation is not well constrained. Here we document the formation of dense shelf water in the Cape Darnley polynya (65°–69° E) and its subsequent transformation into bottom water using data from moorings and instrumented elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). Unlike the previously identified sources of Antarctic Bottom Water, which require the presence of an ice shelf or a large storage volume, bottom water production at the Cape Darnley polynya is driven primarily by the flux of salt released by sea-ice formation. We estimate that about 0.3–0.7×106 m3 s−1 of dense shelf water produced by the Cape Darnley polynya is transformed into Antarctic Bottom Water. The transformation of this water mass, which we term Cape Darnley Bottom Water, accounts for 6–13% of the circumpolar total. © 2013 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more